Loch Ness and Castle Urquhart

On our way to Inverness we drove along Loch Ness. It’s a very long loch, 22.56 miles long! We never saw a spot to be able to pull over and put our feet in 😦  The water is very dark and very deep and when the wind is blowing and water is rippling or waving I can see how people think they see ‘things’ in the water!

FYI: The prefix inver comes from the Gaelic inbhir.  It means mouth of the river and is often followed by the name of a river which in this case is the River Ness. Inverness lies at the mouth of the River Ness. Loch Ness is connected to the sea via River Ness feeding into the Moray Firth.

Loch facts:
22.56 ft. long
1 mile wide
51 ft. above sea level
It has more water in it than all the lakes and rivers of England and Wales combined
It’s color is caused by peat particles floating in the water
It never freezes over
ospreys fish the waters of the loch
The loch lays on a fault line
The majority of sightings of Nessie have been from the area around Urquhart Castle
Water speed record (over 200mph) was set by John Cobbs on the Loch in the 1950’s

Here are some interesting links about the loch…
Nova: The Legend of Loch Ness
A Livecam on the Loch
The Wellington Bomber Crash from WWII

Looking north

Looking south

My sweet tired chauffeur, Jack. He’s a real gem!

Bluebells on the hillside

 This is Castle Urquhart sitting on the shores of Loch Ness. Fascinating history around here! The Picts lived here. The castle dates back to 1230ish! Read about it here.

It is now in the hands of Historic Scotland and there is a charge to go in. We decided not to as it was getting late in the day and we still had some driving to do to get to our hotel in Inverness and we were all tired.

Castle Urquhart on the loch

 Didn’t get any of those ‘postcard’ views of the loch, but it is a beautiful place and I can say I was there!

Peggy Ann

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6 thoughts on “Loch Ness and Castle Urquhart

  1. Yes you got some really great photos, considering THEY just about had it all corralled off with farmland, meaning we couldn't get access. As Joan says – they could all be used as postcards.

    Like

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